Personal Finance Resources

personal finance resources

The following is a brief list of personal finance resources that I have found very useful in my quest for financial independence. There are literally unlimited sources of content and information on various financial topics. I am only selecting a few of my favorites to share with you. If I find something new or especially interesting, I will be sure to add to this list.

Books

  • Your Money or Your Life, by Vicki Robin and Joe Dominguez- this book may have single-handedly launched the financial independence movement. A must read.
  • Early Retirement Extreme, by Jacob Lund Fisker- this is actually the first book I read on the topic of FI. Jacob takes frugal living to the extreme (hence the title), but he introduces many sound principles that can be applied by even the early-stage FI-er.
  • The Millionaire Next Door, by Thomas Stanley – an excellent profile of the typical American Millionaire. The book offers insight into why “keeping up with the Jones’s” is not the path to success.

Blogs

  • Mr. Money Mustache – I would say at least 50% of the FIRE blogs I read include an anecdote whereby the author was clued in to the possibility of FI through reading MMM’s blog. Pete is an inspiration to all of us fledgling FI-ers, and certainly one of the core figures of the modern FI movement.
  • Get Rich Slowly – JD Roth is also one of the “OG’s” in the FI world. Tons of useful information here as well.
  • Mad Fientist – I discovered the Mad Fientist’s blog soon after Mr. Money Mustache, and have enjoyed everything from this blog ever since. I especially am enamored with this site because it focuses on numbers. My friends make fun of the fact that I have “a spreadsheet for everything,” and I have a feeling that Brandon does as well. If you love tax optimization and statistical projections, you’ll love this blog.
  • JLcollinsnh – if you want a site focused more on the investing side of personal finance, this is your place. The “Stock Series” might be the only thing you ever have to read on the topic of “how should I invest the money that I saved?”
  • Rockstar Finance – a great curator of content. Also includes a directory of FI bloggers, plus resources for bloggers, if you’re into that thing.

Software / Apps

  • Personal Capital – Personal Capital is a great way to track all of your financial accounts, including banks, investment accounts, loans and credit cards. You can also track your income and spending, your asset allocation, and use a Retirement Checkup analyzer to see how you’re doing with respect to hitting your financial targets.
  • Mint – I still prefer Mint (from Intuit) for getting into the nitty-gritty of my spending habits. It is a more customizable solution for categorizing, arranging, and tracking your spending. It also has a great budgeting function.